Lines in the Sand Simon Parker, published in The MJ, May 13, 2016

If we Brexit, we will need to find new ways for different sets of values and different models of economic development to cohabit on this little island.

Lines in the Sand
Contracting: why local authorities should value more than price Sarah Stopforth, Published in Public Finance, May 13, 2016

The current commissioning process pits charities against each other in competition to access the ever-dwindling pot of public sector funding. Yet the voluntary and community sector is not a homogeneous group and should not be treated as such.

Contracting: why local authorities should value more than price
We need to shift our focus to supporting good health, not just treating ill-health Jessica Studdert, Published in Quality Watch, May 11, 2016

In relation to finance, it is no surprise that funding pressures were cited by the professionals as having a detrimental effect on quality and an uncertain future for public health. Funding cuts have been made in the context of short-term national funding cycles which separate out costs and consequences of budget decisions.

We need to shift our focus to supporting good health, not just treating ill-health
Renewing local government – cell by cell Abigail Gilbert, May 4, 2016

Apoptosis is a form of altruistic suicide, executed by a single cell to protect the integrity of the wider genome. Cells have a set lifespan: a set number of times they can replicate before they become a hazard to life.

Renewing local government – cell by cell
devolution dilemmas Simon Parker, published in The MJ, April 17, 2016

Today’s councils are a bit like salmon swimming upstream. As long as they keep fighting against the river they can slowly get closer to their goal. The second they stop, the current of centralism will wash them back out to sea.

devolution dilemmas
Keeping NHS on track demands a 15-year map Jessica Studdert, published in Public Finance, March 18, 2016

The NHS was designed to solve the health problems of a nation in the middle of the last century. To effectively tackle the challenges of the 21st century it needs to move from a service for sick people to a system that supports wellness – and that means reaching out so that everyone plays a greater part.

Keeping NHS on track demands a 15-year map